On what’s after postmodernism: holistic pragmatic clarification of concepts

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Contradictions, obfuscations, and lack of clarity have not only seized so much of academia (as my friend Heather Lockheart brilliantly discusses in her thesis on the topic) but also it has led to the emboldening of blatant racism from President Trump and his supporters, along with a wider embrace of immorality in general. Trump’s TV lawyer Rudolph Giuliani has gone so far as arguing that “truth is not truth.” Where did this postmodern way of thinking come from? Can we blame Nietzsche? Although postmodernism clearly leads to problematic modes of thought, does it raise any valid points? Is there anything “after” or “beyond” postmodernism? I say “yes!” and that includes some iteration of a holistic pragmatic clarification of concepts. 

PRODUCED BY ASHLEY O’CONNOR AND MONTANIZ STILLS

Thank you again for visiting the Public Comment website which I created back in 2012. After 7 years of  experimentation and uncertainty about the identity and direction the website should take on, I established, in June of 2019, an official focuses on politics and philosophy and launched the podcast. As a political activist and philosopher, my goal here on Public Comment is to contribute to a universal dialogue of critical, creative, and introspective thought on politics and philosophy– a dialogue I hope you’ll join in the comments below.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-q8w9q-b8529c

On competition

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Competition is an inevitable part of life. Even at the most metaphysical and psychological level, this piece of perception and that piece are competing for our integrated and perceptual focus and perspective. If you look out the window you inevitably choose where your eyes will focus, and some aspects of the scenery will lose out to other aspects in scope or magnification. There may be some ways to curb the anxiety inducing aspects of inevitable competition, or even get rid of competition in certain parts of our lives altogether, thanks to niche marketing and hyper-personalization. But to what degree should we get rid of competition? To what degree (if any at all?) do the postmodern aspects of niche marketing and hyper-personalization destroy opportunities for universal experience and community? 

Thank you again for visiting the Public Comment website which I created back in 2012. After 7 years of  experimentation and uncertainty about the identity and direction the website should take on, I established, in June of 2019, an official focuses on politics and philosophy and launched the podcast. As a political activist and philosopher, my goal here on Public Comment is to contribute to a universal dialogue of critical, creative, and introspective thought on politics and philosophy– a dialogue I hope you’ll join in the comments below.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-fw56z-b82f3d

Of course I believe that things are always more complex… (Vlog #39)

More on identifying a “target audience” and the development of this vlog.

*Annoyed by postmodernism, nihilism, sophistry?

*Want more “real” talk?

*Building on Montaigne’s personal approach to philosophy

*No elitism or populism here!

*The evolution & development of the Public Comment Vlog

In Search of Independence (Sean O’Connor’s Public Comment video diary vlog– episode #5)

If you’ve heard Bob Dylan’s song “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” then perhaps you will understand? Here’s the sense of conflict: this deep rooted desire for all-encompassing independence– economic, ideological, political, intellectual– thinking something like: “To Hell with academia!” To Hell with the corporations and ‘big business!’ To Hell with everyone who stands to gain a profit of the information they sell us! To Hell with the ‘Main Stream Media!’ To Hell with Religion!” To Hell with so called ‘art!’! et cetera…and you think it because you have a vision that just doesn’t seem to fit with all the many standards out there (ironically enough!)– too blunt to be a poet, too academic to be a journalist, too populist to be an academic, too conceptual to establish a conventional ‘narrative,’ too self preserving to be “corporate,” too “independent” to belong to a political party…

Yet, I’m not the anti-social type. I enjoy academia, I enjoy the big businesses –main stream media for example, like MSNBC — and while I’m not religious, I’m deeply influenced by Christian ideas like that wonderful maxim “forgive them of their sins, they know not what they do.” So I strive to find a balance between maintaining a sense of independence while also engaging in my love for community. This is what I talk about on this episode of the Public Comment Blog which you can watch or listen to.