On marketing (part 3: marketing education should be required in schools)

“this is about  people understanding that they’re going to be finding their way into an economy”

Listen to the podcast

This is part 3 of a series of podcasts on marketing which includes a review on how I’ve developed my thoughts on marketing thus far (see podcasts: “On marketing ((part 1))” & “On marketing ((part 2))”  for more on that), my argument for providing marketing education early, comments on my own lack of marketing education, the the blessing and curse of how a need for teaching myself how to market and put that into practice (oh so slowly) has required me to spend most of my free time researching and applying marketing concepts.  

“what have I talked about earlier on so that you can follow in essence the chain of my thinking on this topic here…” (05:21)   

“theoretically one could argue the very first tidbit of marketing conceptualization that ever was brought to my attention was when I was in preschool… it’s called “Learning Steps Academy” I think or “Learning Steps Preschool.” It was near Cream Ridge, New Jersey, Upper Freehold, if I’m not mistaken. I was like two, three, maybe four during those years back then in 89,’ 90,’ 91,’ around a time period and I remember they taught us this particular song… it goes like this:                         

I am special

I am special

yes I am

yes I am

I am very special

I am very special

yes I am

yes I am 

…there’s a lot of things you could take from teaching very young children that kind of song… a lot of interpretations. You could have a lot of assumptions… you might wonder if one had in the notion of telling two three and four-year-olds to memorize that song it may have something to do though with concept of self-esteem and importance of self-esteem… “(22:41) 

“Unless you’re someone with a predisposed passion for marketing unless you’re someone with parents or friends or family people around you specifically educated in or interested in or involved in some aspect of business or marketing that means that the odds are that’s something that’s just not going to be quite as much a part of your consciousness so some people are getting the knowledge that will enable them to present themselves in really effective ways to make a lot of money and other people are deprived of that… but for a plethora of reasons. There’s not just one but this is a concerning thing this is a obvious, this is an obvious and major slice of the economic inequality conversation and I would think even if you’re a libertarian I would think that you would believe this should be required in education” (31:16- 32:24)

 “it’s not until I am like fifteen when I go to a summer camp called ‘Tomato Patch’ performing arts camp camp for actors singers dancers and visual artists only then in that and at master’s class for actors did I start to learn about the concept of industry specifically the acting industry and how to become an actor not just in the sense of the craft and the aesthetics and the art but in practice so I want to give a shout out to Mr. Daniel Spalluto– a great actor a great acting teacher…now he’s a friend of mine but he taught me back in the day at this Actor’s Master’s class and he was all about the industry and understanding how head shots work and understand what it means to get an agent and understanding what it means to be part of a union… this is about  people understanding that they’re going to be finding their way into an economy”  (33:50- 34:58) 

 “I took a journalism class and was able to participate in the College VOICE: the student newspaper for Mercer County Community College and professor Holly Katherine Johnson, she was always very industry minded and always letting us know this is how you want to conceptualize a resume… it’s nice to talk about in journalism in theory but this is how journalism works in practice in terms of how newspapers actually run or websites actually run or magazines actually run ,etc…” (43:24-43:55) 

“I never knew how much time it would be important for me to spend on my marketing endeavors” (47:08)  

“So it’s interesting because I was hoping that I would have been spending a lot more time reading my philosophy books and reading articles and politics and listening to politics podcasts and things in that realm but it turns out all of that time is now being spent learning about marketing practicing marketing and being involved in social media and reading about all these things and I’m not saying this is actually a bad thing …actually I think it’s serendipitous because I think it also turns out that this is a good field for advances in philosophical thinking (51:23- 52:02)

For more from Public Comment check out the website: https://publiccomment.blog/

Subscribe to and/or download the Public Comment Podcast at Podbean, RadioPublic ,   Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Play Music 

Subscribe at https://www.youtube.com/user/seanoconnoressays/featured 

Visit me on Facebook at  https://www.facebook.com/publiccommentblog

Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/publiccomment.blog/

Tweet me at https://twitter.com/sopubliccomment

Connect with me on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/soconnorwritingtutor/ 

Email me at sean.publiccomment@gmail.com

Thank you again for visiting the Public Comment podcast– a podcast that embraces social democracy and a holistic pragmatic clarification of concepts. As a political activist and philosopher, my goal here on Public Comment is to contribute to a universal dialogue among intellectuals, politicos, artists, and humanists– the critical, creative, and introspective thinkers– on political and philosophical matters– a dialogue I hope you’ll join in the comments below.

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-3ajir-b871a7

On Graduating College (Sean O’Connor’s Public Comment video diary vlog– episode #8)


-From an F in Math in fifth grade to a 3.98 GPA and a Bachelor’s Degree in Liberal Studies at 33 years old… my views on education have evolved significantly-

LISTEN TO THE PUBLIC COMMENT PODCAST

The philosopher and writer Michel de Montaigne– whose work I had the opportunity to study in college– continues to influence and inspire me. I revere his contribution to the development of the “personal essay” and the written treatment of individual subjects from the perspective of reflection on experience with/connection to such subjects. In this context one can learn about the person in particular, the human soul in general, the topic, in a conversation as opposed to a lecture or pure argument. And in the case of essays such as the sort Montaigne wrote, there’s the freedom to digress, in his case, in and out of history, philosophy, politics, et cetera.

I think of Montaigne now, as I contemplate my extemporaneous, thinking-out- loud- as- I- go approach to vlogging and podcasting, and as I touch on the subject of graduating college, from the perspective of someone who once received an F in fifth grade and dropped out of college multiple times to someone who fell in love with academia, graduated with a  3.98 GPA and was granted the privilege to speak at his college graduation. That is to say, there is, among the ironies, the irony that while I possess some “academically” derived thoughts on my academic experiences—I mean, based on scholarly articles, and university research from which I could merely synthesize that sea of research—I could not speak with accuracy if I detached from my personal connection to this subject.

To graduate at 33 as opposed to 22 years old, at points in my reflection, brings sadness and regrets because sometimes it can seem like all this does is confirm some notion of myself as slow compared to my smarter peers. Yet I don’t think that way about those who are my age or my elders who earn their college degrees later than is “conventional.” That would be to do what Ayn Rand referred to as “context dropping.” As one former professor of mine once said, “you never know where you are in someone else’s narrative.” She was actually citing a former professor of hers. Moreover, what is the problem with not going right to college or never going? College simply offers an array of specific opportunities to receive specific sets of knowledge. Seemingly countless resources of knowledge exist beyond the college setting. What matters is not whether one attends a university or not but rather the question of what one seeks to learn and what one aspires to achieve with that knowledge. (This is not to say that I downplay the incredible value, especially of community, that various types of schools, whether university, college or trade school, can offer. I think too much autodidacticism might lead to isolation and a kind of anti-social philosophy; at least this turned out to be the case in my experience).

Central to the context behind my academic struggles was mental illness (depression an anxiety specifically) combined with incorrect and poorly defined, fundamental philosophical principles. Even when I possessed a scientific epistemology, I didn’t think about how it applied to much more than science. I had no real sense of values. Not because my family failed to instill them but because I wasn’t taught, in high school, any kind of serious intellectual presentation of theories of values and ethics. How much of a difference would that have made? How much difference would consistent mental/psychological check-ups have made? I don’t believe in torturing myself with “what if’s” but I do like gaining an understanding of context behind how events transpire. That is something I gained from the many history courses I took.

So, with psychological and philosophical reasons for detaching from “school” from elementary school through my first few years of college, I retreated to the arts. In my childhood, horror stories, movies, writing, and acting were my refuge.

As inclined to the arts as I may have been, with very few exceptions, I treated my artistic endeavors with profound narcissism. That is to say, the concentration I put into writing, passionate though I may have been in some sense, I feared any kind of real feedback and thus, while I always hoped for people to praise whatever poem or performance I shared with them, really, alas, I didn’t think about it as constructive feedback to help me produce anything meaningfully consequential. It was largely my escape from academic standards at play.       

By my sophomore year of college—when I attended Florida Gulf Coast University—I experienced further ironies. While convinced of my incompetence and lacking “belief” in knowledge, I was nonetheless engaged in philosophizing and extracurricular study of poets who interested me, including Kerouac, Ginsberg, Dylan, Morrison, Rimbaud, Baudelaire, Ovid, Sappho, Shelley, Lennon—all the ones I considered the “rebels” of poetry. Even after I dropped out (then returned, then dropped out again, then returned, then dropped out again…), I remained avid as a reader, and persistent in my desire to be something of an intellectual artist or an artistic intellectual, delving into Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, William James, John Dewey, Dostoevsky, Napoleon Hill and eventually Ayn Rand.

My Ayn Rand phase with even more ironic yet because I became an “objectivist” who now believed in “knowledge” staunchly so, and spent all my free time reading non-fiction books, yet I still maintained my “anti-academia” perspective. This newfound objectivism, alas, failed to facilitate my eradication of the frustrating poverty and tedium of cashiering, even when it led to my first run for political office. As I thought more and more about my life logically it occurred to me I ought to return to college and there I saw, gradually, the pile of contradictions that made up my puritanical sort of “objectivism” (I call myself, for a lack of better words thus far, a “clarificationist” because I believe we can strive for objectivity and gain ever greater clarity but never quite get a point of absolutism or pure objectivity). Likewise, I saw the flaws with my libertarianism as I took courses on poverty, Native Americans, women and the law, the Holocaust/Nazi Germany, the U.S. judicial system, et cetera, and learned how leaving people “free” to exploit and abuse leads to exploitation and abuse. Not in every case, but often enough that it remains rampant today.

I thought, as my college education reached its final chapter, that an MFA in Creative Writing was in my future. This seemed to me the ultimate way I could build a community of greater person- to -person understanding, empathy, intellectual freedom or free thought (which is what Creative Writing came to mean to me as a concept) (I mean, as a “creative writer” and professor of the subject) and even though I’ve been offered an opportunity to study at graduate school, the last five months out of college have thrust me into deeper questions about the meaning of practicality, contributing the world, making money, finding a place in these revolutionary times, and making the most of the college education I received.